Green Pioneers Interview: Tristan Titeux on Eco Furniture

To help celebrate the work of green pioneers and share great environmental achievements with the world we have decided to produce a series of interviews with a huge range of green champions from across the world.

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This week we’ve interviewed Tristan Titeux who has developed a range of eco furniture, which uses more environmentally friendly materials and reduces waste.

What do you do?

I design and build fitted furniture. In the winter of 2011 I decided to follow my heart and passion, which is for the environment and safeguarding it for my children and the future. I decided to bring out an eco friendly option for customers who feel the same. I researched materials and methods and really tried to uncover just how eco friendly they all are; I now take great interest in discovering all the different available eco materials around the world [you can find out about them here].

I also decided to look into the waste we were producing as a fitted furniture company. We use big sheets of wood that are cut up to make things like wardrobes, bookcases and home offices and are often left with lots of small useless pieces. I took inspiration from the materials and concluded that the most environmentally friendly method was to use as many of the small pieces as possible so that very little would be thrown away. This is how the Milo series of furniture was born: using pieces of wood glued together face to face, leaving just the ends and edges of the wood. It creates a really beautiful effect with all the varying colours and textures. I exhibited at the Surface Design Show and had a Milo shelf on display. Everyone kept coming up to the shelf and stroking it and asking questions. The way it leads people to ask questions about the materials is what I love about the Milo series. People often don’t know what many of these materials are, let alone where they come from and how they are made. It gives me great pleasure to explain all about them.

What is your background?

My father was an ecologist; he spoke about wild plants on the radio for many years and he taught me what nature has to offer us, we had our own garden for food, chickens and goats for eggs and meat. We picked mushrooms in the countryside and found salad leaves and medicine too. This experience cemented my deep care and understanding of nature.

Later on I moved back to London and worked as a photographer for 12 years. This very much helped my creative side, which now helps me when designing fitted furniture. I work very visually and can see if things look right just like when composing a picture in the camera.

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The first Milo table

What work have you done so far to develop your eco friendly line?

Milo was the first piece of furniture in the Milo series, and I have since then designed a larger Taro table that would go in front of a sofa, as well as many other bespoke pieces such as a wine display unit for the Naturally Chinese restaurant in Kingston, floating shelves for private clients and a bedside Milo table made from a client’s old wardrobe. We are currently building a huge Milo boardroom table and we have just finished making some awards and a lectern for the Pea business awards.

My dream would be to broaden the market for the Milo series and train disadvantaged young people to make them. I am already in talks with a charity that could make the latter part a reality.

I also give talks in schools and businesses that are really interested in learning more about eco materials and waste.

Why is this work important?

It is vital to get children and teenagers involved as early as possible, that is why I want to talk in schools more and get young people making Milo tables. As well as giving them practical skills, it would empower them to have made beautiful furniture that they are proud to have their name on. Children need to understand as early as possible about what is happening to the world. The mainstream media doesn’t offer enough of the truth of what is really going on and how serious it is. We all know that the world is warming and we are running out of natural gases, but people don’t realize how seriously affected we will be in the near future from pollution, deforestation and climate change. If I can help children to want to find solutions to all of this then they can take charge of our planet’s future.

What can people do to take part?

I would love visit more schools and give talks tailored to them about my work, the Milo table and eco materials. I would also welcome requests from anyone wanting to work with me to promote the eco range. People looking for eco fitted furniture (including children’s bedrooms) should check out my website: www.customcarpentry.co.uk. Anyone who wants advice on what eco materials and products they can use to transform their house into a dream eco home should go to www.EcoDesignerHome.com. This is my other website that helps curate local craftsmen, eco materials and products.

What green issues are you most passionate about?

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A football pitch sized area of Rainforest is chopped down every second

For me, green issues are actually a case of justice. I am passionate about green issues because I am passionate about justice to others and to the environment, so really that covers everything from food production to growing crops to making eco materials. It affects everything, the environment is everything, so I can’t pick one because it is one. One that is relevant to my work is the deforestation of the rainforests. Many materials, such as plywood, are still sourced from trees in the rainforests and we are losing an area the size of a football pitch every second in order to fill demand for it. This is simply not acceptable. Not only are rainforests the lungs of the world but also they contain so many species that could benefit mankind; from food to medicines and plants, there are materials that we will be able to use to replace plastics and petrol. To squander this resource as if there was no tomorrow is selfish. This is why it is so important to me to tell people about the all the many alternatives there are to using wood for making furniture. We can’t just rely on one type of material, we will need many.

Tristan is working with us to create some special eco book displays for our Books for Free centres, we look forward to sharing the results with you when they have been built.

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There is no planet B: Can Art inspire change?

Stitch Calendar Competition 2012 - There is not planet B

Stitch Calendar Competition 2012 – There is not planet B
http://www.stitchproject.com

Stitch Calendar Competition 2012 – There is no planet B

We are bombarded with so many different ways in which we could be greener and help look after our planet. Car adverts stress the importance of reducing your carbon footprint; magazine covers brag they have the top ten answers to living a greener life. We can’t escape it. Although we can’t walk anywhere without tripping up on the words “recycle”, some of us still manage to forget there is still so much more that can be done.

Stitch are hosting a competition inviting artists and photographers of all walks of life, to submit artwork with the theme “There is no planet B.” Stitch is a not-for-profit organisation that raises environmental awareness through the arts.

The twelve winning images will be used for a calendar to remind you, each and every day, that this planet we live in has a limit. The artwork will inspire you to be proactive about looking after the planet, reminding you that making small changes can make a huge impact. As if that wasn’t enough of an incentive, the winners will also receive a cut of the profit from sales of the calendar. (for more information see Stitch Calendar Competition 2012 PDF )

Art has been used for many years as  a way to express the conversations of the time- so what better way to express the desire to educate ourselves on the way to keep Earth a great place to live?

Inspirational eco art

We have picked out pieces of art which captured our imaginations with their eco-friendly approach to materials and inventive work:

Images courtesy of crosshatchling.co.uk

Images courtesy of crosshatchling.co.uk

Images courtesy of crosshatchling.co.uk

Images courtesy of crosshatchling.co.uk

Artist Anna Garforth is an incredible artist whose approach to recyclable materials is fascinating. Her experimental artwork is pushing the boundaries of eco art, with pieces such as edible posters, typography using reusable materials such as paper of old yellow pages. The idea of an installation made of moss, may sound peculiar to the rest of us, but Garforth’s work transforms something which is often overlooked (unless you are a gardener) into something solid and relevant. The Moss Cross is an example and was produced for the temporary project for The Urban Physic Garden.  In July Garforth also displayed her moss art work at a vacant wall in Kings cross. The moss formed a beautiful symmetrical pattern, standing out against the dullness of the city concrete. Fascinating and original.

Photographs by Ueslei Marcelino / Reuters (via hungeree.com)

Photographs by Ueslei Marcelino / Reuters (via hungeree.com)

On a more international front, we were also very intrigued by the use of plastic bottles for an incredible sculpture of fish, on Botafogo Beach in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The piece was an inspiring form of protest which coincided with the Earth summit for United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development, which took place in the city in June. Accompanied by the slogan “Recycle your attitude”, it was a perfect example of art being a way to highlight an important cause. These spectacular giant fish were made up of tens of thousands of discarded water bottles, masterfully lit with internal and external lights, giving off the effect of shimmering scales. A powerful and thoughtful message about the ocean and our attitude’s to waste.

Photographs by Ueslei Marcelino / Reuters (via hungeree.com)

Photographs by Ueslei Marcelino / Reuters (via hungeree.com)

As you’ve seen many artists have used materials to make art and bring attention to greener causes; this is what the Stitch competition is about. Inspiring and educate simultaneously with images which are unavoidable and predict a future which is entirely in our hands.

Quick,  get your entries in as the competition ends on the 21st of October (extended deadline) ! We are really looking forward to seeing the end result. If you want to get your hands on a copy of the calendar follow Stitch on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/TheStitchProject or any questions of queries, get in touch by emailing calendar@stitchproject.com

Visit the Stich website for more information on the competition www.stitchproject.com